Category Archives: Mixology

Suerte Blanco Review & Tasting Notes

Suerte Blanco

Highlands sweetness with a down-to-earth complexity.

The Spanish word “Suerte” translates to “luck.” The bottles of all three Suerte expressions are decorated with a marketing-friendly rabbit designed by a tattoo artist in a native Mexican (Aztec/Mayan) style. It’s accompanied by a Partida/spirit bird-style origin story. This time, tequila was discovered by a farmer’s wife who saw a rabbit getting tipsy on fermented agave. It makes for an attractive package, and the rabbit is a fitting mascot, as this tequila has a few tricks up its sleeve.

Suerte BlancoBasic Stats
NOM: 1530 (Tequilera Simbolo, S.A. de C.V.)
Region: Highlands
Oven: Brick
Extraction: Tahona
Distillation: Stainless steel pot stills, double-distilled
Proof: 80 (40% abv)
Price: $30 to $36
Availability: Throughout Colorado, with possible expansion to both coasts soon.
Website: drinksuerte.com

Tasting and Mixing Notes
The blanco is rested in stainless steel tanks for two months prior to bottling. Sweet highlands baked agave is pronounced on the aroma and the flavor. This is definitely a plus for this reviewer, as I prefer my blancos to be fairly aggressive on the agave (highlands or lowlands). There are very nice, lingering notes of melon, grass, and mint on the nose. These aromas make it inside the bottle, too, with added flavors of pear, grass and a nice vegetal finish.

My one minor gripe with this blanco is that the sweetness and grass may be a little too pronounced, especially after being exposed to air for 15 or 20 minutes. The more subtle notes that give this blanco more complexity get less pronounced. (You have to catch this rabbit quickly!) Interestingly, I found that mixing Suerte blanco into a margarita not only retains the complexity I got with the first taste, but the sweet and grassy flavors are kept at bay in addition to bringing very lovely fruit and herbal notes to a traditional margarita.

Ryan’s Tequila Matchmaker Rating
Aroma – 23/25
Flavor – 24/30
Finish – 21/25
Value – 8/10
Drink again? – Yes
Recommend – Yes
Total Score – 86

So how does this rabbit age? While the reposado and añejo expressions are solid representations of highlands tequilas, and pleasant enough to sip, I didn’t find them as unique and interesting as the blanco, the clear winner in the Suerte lineup.

Also on Tequila Aficionado: Sipping off the Cuff with Suerte Tequila

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The Evolution of the Tequila Bar by M.A. “Mike” Morales

mike morales, the evolution of the tequila bar, tequila, la capilla, mercado

Tequila Aficionado’s Mike Morales describes in a dynamic format with text, video, and photos, the evolution of the tequila bar from old Mexico to present day Santa Monica.

Excerpt from The Evolution of the Tequila Bar:

From the early 1930s to the late 1950s, Mexico’s Golden Age of Cinema exposed the world to Los Tres Gallos Mexicanos (The Three Mexican Roosters), popular male mariachi singers of the day.  Jorge Negrete, Pedro Infante and the legendary Javier Solis often portrayed gallant singing cowboys suffering from unrequited love and heartbreak.  Those definitive black and white movies also gave a glimpse inside the iconic cantinas, the first real tequila bars, where these films’ most memorable musical moments occurred.  Experience it by clicking here!

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Approachable Tequila Cocktails by M.A. “Mike” Morales

Gilbert Marquez, mixology, bartender, storyteller, tequila cocktailsGilbert Marquez explains the finer points of introducing the uninitiated to tequila and how to gently ease them into the world of the aficionado through finely crafted cocktails.

Click here to see M.A. “Mike” Morales’ interview clip on Approachable Tequila Cocktails.

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Patron Killing

Charlie Mashni of Depot Nuevo in Chicago discusses his technique for Patron Killing.

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Margarita Anyone? Of Course!

margarita, tequila, alexander perezBy Alexander Perez | 06.02.10

Aahh… the so enticing Margarita. Just pronouncing it – mar-ga-rita – brings a smile to your face. It conjures thoughts of chips and salsa, fresh home made tortillas, mariachis and good times. It is, after all Americas most popular cocktail. So much so that we even have a National Margarita Day. Now you don’t need to wait for a special holiday or occasion to mix one up. Why not bring out the bartender in you and try making one at home. Its easier then you think.

Yes there are quite a few Margarita recipes out there. You have your Blue, Golden, Frozen, Strawberry, Banana and Mango Margarita. But nothing beats an original Margarita from scratch. I guarantee your guests will come back for more.

crystal light, margarita, mix, tequila, tequila aficionado, sugar free, dietI always use fresh ingredients and serve it on the rocks never blended. Just fresh squeezed key limes (2 oz), simple syrup (1oz), Triple Sec (1/2oz), and of course a 100 percent blue agave blanco tequila (1 ½ – 2 oz). Shake it in a shaker with ice and pour it in a salt rimmed glass over ice. Make it a Cadillac Margarita with a splash of Grand Marnier or Patron Citronage. Never use mix or sweet and sour. Once you try it fresh I promise you’ll never go back to mix. I rather get cramps in my hands from squeezing a hundred limes for my guests then using bottled mix. Believe me I’ve broken a few lime squeezers in my Liquid Lab (my kitchen).

To make simple syrup just boil 2 cups of sugar with 2 cups of water. Mix the sugar until the water is clear. Let it cool down, pour it in a bottle and place it in the fridge for your next Margarita. It will keep in your fridge for a month or more.

Here are some conversation pieces to share on your next Margarita party:

  • jose cuervo, tequila, margarita, mix, original, limeThe Margarita was the most popularly ordered drink in 2008, representing 18 percent of all mixed drink sales in the U.S., followed by the Martini, Rum and Coke, Vodka and Tonic, and the Cosmopolitan (Cheers On-Premise Handbook 2008)
  • On average, Americans consume 185,000 Margaritas per hour (Brown-Forman, 2008)
  • Atlanta, Miami, St. Louis and Nashville are among the best major metro cities for the Margarita (Cheers On-Premise Handbook 2008)The first frozen margarita machine was invented in 1971 and it was based off a soft-serve ice cream machine
  • The U.S. is the number one tequila market – larger and more important than Mexico (Cheers On-Premise Handbook 2008)
  • The only “officially recognized” margarita by the International Bartender’s Association is the version served on the rocks with a salt rim.
  • The South (Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, Texas, etc.) accounts for 34.9 percent of margarita sales. (Cheers On-Premise Handbook 2008)
  • There’s debate over who invented the margarita, but a popular story has it invented in 1948 by socialite Margarita Sames. According to the legend it was during a party at her cliff side hacienda in Acapulco, that Margarita began looking for something cool to cut the dust of a hot afternoon. So she experimented by mixing Tequila Herradura, Cointreau and fresh lime juice.

Alexander Perez is the founder of Tequila Aficionado.com having thought of the idea of a premium tequila and mezcal online magazine back in the early 1999. With an extensive background in wine and spirits, having been in the industries for many years, Alex fell in love with the under appreciated spirits of Mexico, Tequila and Mezcal. His mission: to educate the public on these fine spirits.

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