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Sipping Off The Cuff: Dulce Vida Reposado

 dulce vida, tequila, reposadoDulce Vida Q&A

Dulce Vida’s Christopher Cain was kind enough to answer the questions we had earlier this week about Dulce Vida Tequila.  As you may recall, this is an organic overproof tequila so you know Mike Morales had lots of questions!

Regarding the source of their agave:

“Initially we did source our agave from both the Pacific Coastal Highlands of Nayarit as well as the highlands surrounding San Ignacio and Arandas.  For the last three+ years we have moved that to be exclusively from a co-op of growers in the Highlands surrounding San Ignacio and Arandas.”

Regarding the palate feel:

“What you may taste different in our base is the MLF that we do in order to give you a fuller, coating mouth feel.   Most producers do not take the time to go through this step.  That secondary fermentation sets our pre-distillate apart from the herd and allows what we distill to proof here to not be offensive to the taste.”

Cain went on to say:

“We can’t thank you enough for the review and kind words.  Its truly a passion and labor of love, which is why we produce it and do not allow anybody else to do it for us.”

Thanks, Christopher!  Tequila Aficionado is a labor of love for us as well, so we completely understand your passion.

 

dulce vida, tequila, reposadoFind Dulce Vida Online:

Website - Facebook Twitter -  YouTube - Blog

Malolactic Fermentation (MLF)

If you’re unfamiliar with MLF, it stands for Malolactic Fermentation.  This process is used most in wine production.

AromaDictionary.com goes on to explain this process as it relates to winemaking:

Malolactic fermentation is commonly referred to as “MLF”, or (in winemaker’s speak as) “malo” (pronounced may-low). So if MLF is a type of fermentation, what ferments, what does the fermenting, and most importantly, what sort of changes does MLF make to the final sensory quality of the wine? MLF usually occurs shortly after the end of the primary fermentation (when the grape sugar is converted to alcohol by yeast). It is undertaken by the family of lactic acid bacteria (LAB); Oenococcus oeni, and various species ofLactobacillus and Pediococcus. The primary function of all these bacteria is to convert one of the two major grape acids found in wine called L- malic acid, to another type of acid, L-lactic acid. This conversion is accompanied by the production of carbon dioxide (so hence the term, fermentation). Lactic acid tastes markedly less sour than malic acid. In addition lactic acid has a mouthfeel “softness” about it in comparison to the oft described “hard” and “metallic edged” malic acid. In short, MLF results in a natural de- acidification and softening of the wine’s palate. Grapes produced in cool regions tend to be high in acidity much of which comes from the contribution of malic acid. For wines produced from such grapes, de-acidification via MLF is particularly useful as it results in a more balanced and palatable wine.

Although acid reduction is the most obvious result of the growth of lactic acid bacteria in wine, their action can also significantly modify the wine’s aroma, flavour and mouthfeel. These changes may be either good, bad or positively ugly depending to a large extent on which of the lactic acid bacteria dominates the MLF. Some of the Lactobacillus species have been implicated in the production of fetid milk, sauerkraut and sweaty characters. Whilst many high quality Old World wines are characterised and complexed by lactic nuances such as these, when dominant they are rather unpleasant. Some forms of Lactobacillus are also responsible for the production of “mousy taint” which is arguably the most unpleasant of all wine faults. Oenococcus oeni on the other hand is a far more desirable LAB as it typically produces substances that have pleasant and wine sympathetic aromas and flavours. Diacetyl is the most important of these substances, as it provides the most recognisable and characteristic of all MLF characters; butteryness. However, when in excess, diacetyl imparts strong caramel and rancid butter like characters, which can easily dominate the wine. Luckily, the more oenologically desirable Oenococcus oeni generally dominates the MLF as it has a greater tolerance to the high acid and high alcohol environ- ment of wine than the other lactic acid bacteria.

MLF is also thought to generally enhance the body and flavour persistence of wine, producing wines of greater palate softness and roundness. Many winemakers also feel that better integration of fruit and oak character can be achieved if MLF occurs during the time the wine is in barrel.

Wines that typically undergo, and are improved by MLF, are the full-bodied dry whites and medium to full bodied dry reds. But it must be stressed that not all wines benefit from MLF. Rieslings are a classic case in point. As a general rule, the quality of lighter bodied fruit driven wines that require crisp acidity are reduced by the action of MLF. The growth of all LAB are inhibited by cool temperatures and the anti-microbial agent, sulfur dioxide (SO2). Winemakers are therefore able to arrest the onset of MLF when making these styles by maintaining both low temperatures and reasonable SOlevels during winemaking and subsequent bottling.

There is also a major practical reason why MLF is encouraged during the making of many wines, and in particular reds wines that have previously undergone malo in tank or barrel are far less likely to go through malo when in bottle. The onset of MLF in the bottle is disastrous as the wine will appear to the consumer to still be fermenting (as a result of CO2 being produced). The wine may also lose its fruit integrity and take on the unpleasant lactic aroma of cured meats.

So next time you open that bottle of Chardonnay, spare a thought for those marvellous critters that helped create that complex aroma and that round out and soften its palate. Cheers to these little creators of diversity.

 

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Coming Soon! Sipping Tequila with Author Saranna DeWylde

Sipping with Saranna DeWylde

M.A. “Mike” Morales discusses an upcoming feature in Lisa’s series, The Education of a Tequila Drinker, where we introduce Author Saranna DeWylde to the joys of sipping Tequila.

 

 

Look for this program where Lisa Pietsch and M.A. “Mike” Morales sip and discuss Diva Tequila, Avion Espresso, Acumbaro, and Avion Reserva 44 with Saranna DeWylde coming soon!

 

About Saranna DeWylde

 

saranna dewylde

Saranna De Wylde has always been fascinated by things better left in the dark. She wrote her first story after watching The Exorcist at a slumber party. Since then, she’s published horror, romance and narrative nonfiction. Like all writers, Saranna has held a variety of jobs, from operations supervisor for an airline, to an assistant for a call girl, to a corrections officer. But like Hemingway said, “Once writing has become your major vice and greatest pleasure, only death can stop it.” So she traded in her cuffs for a full-time keyboard. She loves to hear from her readers.

 

 

fat, saranna dewylde, tequilasweet hell on fire, sara lunsford, sara arden, saranna dewyldesaranna dewylde, desperate housewives  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TV rights to her memoir SWEET HELL ON FIRE: A MEMOIR OF THE PRISON I WORKED IN AND THE PRISON I LIVED IN, the true story of the author’s time as a corrections officer in a maximum security prison for men, have been sold to CBS Television Studios with Kennedy/Marshall (LINCOLN, THE BOURNE LEGACY) producing, by Sean Daily at Hotchkiss and Associates on behalf of Deidre Knight at The Knight Agency.

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Sipping Off The Cuff: Dulce Vida Tequila Blanco

Organic 100 Proof Dulce Vida Tequila Blanco

Alexander Perez and M.A. “Mike” Morales taste and discuss Dulce Vida Tequila Blanco.

 

Dulce Vida Blanco

Winner of the highest honor, the Double Gold Medal at the 2010 World Spirits Competition. Blanco tequilas are bottled immediately after distillation and Dulce Vida’s is as full bodied and vibrant as a good blanco gets. You’ll notice its pleasant herbal citrus aroma and its crisp, spicy flavor with a hint of white pepper and a sweet agave finish. Both delicate and intense, we think you’ll find that it’s perfect for margaritas.

100% Organic

Dulce Vida Tequilas sources its 100% organic agave from the Los Altos highlands in the Tequila region of Mexico. Because of the unique climatic characteristics and the air & soil, this area is well known for producing larger, fruitier agave, ideal for tequila. This organic agave ensures Dulce Vida makes tequila the way tequila has always tasted best: pure and powerful, free of any additives.

 

dulce vida, tequila

 

100 Proof

Dulce Vida produces the only 100° proof, 100% organic tequila in the world and has been nationally recognized as a brand rich in tequila heritage, earning top awards in numerous competitions. What sets Dulce Vida apart is a combination of product attributes, packaging, and taste profile – including Handcrafted Distillation, 100° Proof/Navy Strength, and Organics. 100° Proof provides Dulce Vida the purity, authenticity, and full agave taste that is the cornerstone of our brand. We make our tequila at 100° proof to fashion our spirit in an old-world means, cask-strength, the way spirits were enjoyed years ago.

Find Dulce Vida Online:

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Tequila Distilleries and Brands (NOM List 2 June 2014)

tequila distilleries, nom listMore interesting goings-on at the CRT lately!

When the lists were released on the 26th, somebody uploaded the wrong file to the CRT website.  Apparently, it went unnoticed by CRT desk jockeys for a week before they fixed it.  But they did fix it.

And then the next day, the released a whole new NOM List.

That’s why this is the 2nd Tequila Aficionado NOM List you’re seeing today. 

nom listTequila Distilleries & Brands Updated

Our updated list of tequila distilleries and brands, the “Nom List”, as of 2 June 2014, is now available for download in both PDF and Excel formats. Click on any of the underlined items within the list to be taken directly to our reviews, articles, tasting notes and features on each tequila brand.

nom list

Tequila Brands Old & New

Each of our NOM Lists contains the names and information of brands that have previously appeared on NOM lists in the past but have since been dropped by the CRT. Pinpointing your treasure bottles has never been easier! Please understand that this list is not a comprehensive list of every tequila brand ever made. We make every effort to be sure it is as accurate as possible from the time we at Tequila Aficionado Media began publishing our lists in 2013.  

 

Click to download the format of your choice:

2 June 2014 NOM List in PDF format

2 June 2014 NOM List in Excel format


tequila 88, nom listClick on any RED link within the NOM list to see the Tequila Aficionado articles and reviews on that brand.

*Color Coding*

  • Brands highlighted in Green are recent additions (see comment on Excel spreadsheet for first shown date)
  • Brands highlighted in Red did not appear on the current list (see comment on Excel spreadsheet for last shown date)
  • Brands highlighted in Blue are suspected of using a diffusor in production.

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