Open Bar with Roger Clyne’s Mexican Moonshine

Join us as we interview Roger Clyne and talk about everything under the Mexican Moonshine!

*Please Note*

This is not a telephone call-in show. We will not answer our phones during the show.
If you would like to participate in this show, please click here.

 

Find Roger Clyne’s Mexican Moonshine Online:

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mexican moonshine anejo, roger clyne, peacemakers, tequila,From the Mexican Moonshine Tequila Website:

Arizona-based recording artist Roger Clyne has, for the past fifteen years, created a fan-focused community that meshes music with all forms of merriment infused with southwestern culture and mythologies. To that end, he created the award-winning MexicanMoonshine line of fine tequila, which has just released its third marque, Añejo.

The buttery Añejo boasts honey and woody notes, with hints of tobacco and vanilla. It joins Mexican Moonshine’s Silver and Reposado which in 2011 earned Tequila.net’s “Best of the Best” award. In addition to being a tequila aficionado, Roger is eco-conscious. He developed Mexican Moonshine with Fabrica de Tequilas Finos, SA de CV, a notable boutique tequila distiller in the city of Tequila, Jalisco, Mexico. The distillery uses a clean, sustainable, and progressive process that removes impurities from the waste water. The exceptional quality of the end product is reflective of how the tequila starts.

Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers have been hosting a music festival in Rocky Point, Mexico for many years (2013 was the 22nd event) called Circus Mexicus. In 2004 a small batch of Mexican Moonshine was created as a test run for the Circus Mexicus show and all 1,000 bottles sold out over the festival weekend. It was clear, Mexican Moonshine had a future. A few years later, official paperwork and business design in place, the fledgling tequila was to debut again at Circus Mexicus in Rocky Point but almost didn’t happen. A trusted friend of the band did his own little cross-Mexico moonshine run to make sure the tequila made it in time for the music festival. He got it there the first day of the festival to an exuberant welcome by festival goers!

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers have released six consecutive albums that have debuted in the top 10 on Billboard’s Internet Sales chart, the first independent band to ever accomplish that feat. Two of those albums, 1999s Honky Tonk Union and 2004s ¡Americano!, debuted at #1. That streak of creating timeless rock music continues with RCPM’s most recent studio album, Unida Cantina. In addition to Circus Mexicus (with attendees from more than 32 states and 7 countries) and their headline shows, RCPM have opened for Dierks Bentley, John Fogerty,Willie Nelson,Barenaked Ladies, Live, Blues Traveler, Sammy Hagar and Kid Rock, among others.

“The music they play is impure, dirty, raw, immediate and larger than life; yet it comes squarely from its center; it’s timeless…” – All Music Guide

“…the Bruce Springsteen of the Southwest.” – Asbury Park Press

Clyne enjoyed an accomplished stint with The Refreshments, a late-90s rock band whose cult-classic album Fizzy, Fuzzy, Big & Buzzy produced the hit singles “Banditos” and “Down Together.” Clyne also wrote and performed the theme song for FOX’s animated hit “King of The Hill.”

Whether you are looking for amazing tequila or great rock & roll, look no further than Roger Clyne and his Mexican Moonshine Tequila!

 

 

Tequila Aficionado’s Tequila & Mezcal Road Show, Part 2

[From October 14 to October 28, 2015, Tequila Aficionado Media, accompanied by 33 expressions representing 19 brands, embarked on an epic RV road show christened, The Dia de los Muertos Tequila & Mezcal Tour.  In these next passages, we recount the historic–and hysteric–highlights.]

Inspired In Albuquerque

With the help of Mezcal Legendario Domingo, Lisa and I brainstormed about our black water tank problem.

We would contact Cruise America RV’s headquarters in Mesa, AZ via their Facebook page, and make an appointment with their service department.  Since we were already fans, this impromptu visit would also serve as more content for Tequila Aficionado and Lisa’s personal blog.

Brilliant!

Get Your Kicks

Get your kicks

Having trekked from Albuquerque to Phoenix a few times before,  both Lisa and myself were aware that portions of Interstate 40 coursed along the Mother Road, historic Route 66.

Mother Road

And having lived in New Mexico for many years, I knew that a stop at Route 66 Casino for more photo ops was a must, especially because Route 66 Tequila had come on the tour, as well.

Route 66 CasinoIt was a memorable pit stop for us.  We made a few new friends and had fun doing it!  Check out this video highlight.Route 66 Casino Arrow

 

 

 

 

By The Time I Get to Phoenix

Once we left New Mexico in the rear view mirror and entered Arizona, the scenery changed and so did our mood.

Looking forward to our lunch date with Roger Clyne of Mexican Moonshine in the next couple of days, we decided to enjoy his latest CD, The Independent, and sing along–with hand puppets.

Don’t judge.  It was a long drive!

After a mid-evening check-in at the Desert Shadows RV park in Phoenix, coupled with a late dinner, a snifter of Route 66 tequila for a nightcap seemed appropriate.  But, not too many.

Our appointment with Cruise America’s service department to address our black water tank problem loomed early the next morning.

Cruise America Headquarters

Things-RVers-Say

An impressive fleet of RVs greeted us at Cruise America’s headquarters in Mesa.  Its size and depth was deceiving with ample showrooms inside.  No matter which department we dealt with, though, the company’s dedication to customer service was first rate.

While the service department examined our damaged RV, we spent time speaking with Vice President, Michael Smalley, on several topics concerning Cruise America’s long history and company philosophy.

You can watch the interview here.

Thank You, Cruise America! 

An hour later, the head of the service department conferred with Mr. Smalley.  Knowing that we were pressed for time, Michael advised that the quickest way to get us back enjoying the road and working on our tour was to switch us to a newer RV rather than to have us wait any longer for repairs on the black water tank.

After unloading clothes and supplies from our old RV and reloading the new one, we waved goodbye to our friends at Cruise America and shuttled back to our RV park in Phoenix.

That afternoon, Lisa was expecting her longtime friends and members of her writer’s group, and she was bound and determined to introduce them to fine sipping tequila from Casa 1921.

 The Butterscotch Martini Girls

Once we were safely back at Desert Shadows with a brand new RV, Lisa regaled her friends with 1921 La Crema.  You can view their official introduction to this tequila gem here, and their rave review here.

As for me, I took the time to sit underneath one of the many fruit trees near our space, lit a cigar, and enjoyed the rolling clouds that signaled a cooling monsoon shower just before sunset.

Arizona Plate

Tomorrow, we’d have some Mexican Moonshine in the forecast, courtesy of Roger Clyne.

Sipping off the Cuff with Por Siempre Sotol

Mike and Alex taste and discuss our first Sotol of 2016, Por Siempre Sotol.

sotol, por siempreAbout SOTOL POR SIEMPRE

From the high desert slopes of the Sierra Madres Mountains, in the heart of Chihuahua, Mexico, comes Sotol Por Siempre. A unique spirit distilled from the hearts of wild-harvested sotol, the vital desert plant that has sustained the peoples of this region for thousands of years. Two distillations in an alembic copper pot still preserves subtle smoke and earth flavors which are imparted by pit roasting and open-air fermentation. Six generations of the Perez Family bring you Sotol Por Siempre.

Compania Elaboradora de Sotol, a 6th generation distillery, is proud to introduce Sotol Por Siempre to the United States. An authentic spirit of Mexico, not distilled from agave, but from the native Sotol or desert spoon it shares characteristic similarities to its cousins in spirit, Tequila and Mezcal.

VOLUME: 750 mL
ABV: 45%
NOSE: Opens with bright citrus and white flowers quickly growing herbal and vegetal with an intense note of damp, freshly turned earth and whispers of wood smoke and black pepper.
PALATE: Black pepper spice, earth, mineral, wet stone, rich and chewy texture with a long, dry and mildly smoky finish.

Enjoy Sotol Por Siempre neat, in classic drinks that call for agave spirits like the Margarita and El Diablo or in creative, contemporary cocktails.

La ofrenda…#sotolporsiempre #sotol

A photo posted by Tequila Aficionado (@tequilaaficionado) on

Find Por Siempre Sotol Online

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Sipping off the Cuff with Raicilla Estancia

Mike Morales and Alex Perez of Tequila Aficionado taste and discuss our first Raicilla for review, Raicilla Estancia in this episode of Sipping off the Cuff.

 

raicilla, estanciaAbout Raicilla Estancia:

Made in the highlands of the Sierra Madre Occidental, Raicilla (pronounced rye-see-ya) is an agave spirit deeply rooted in tradition. With a 400 year history in Mexico, our artisan spirit highlights the floral characteristics of the Maximiliana agave, commonly known as Lechuguilla. From the root or “piña” of the Lechuguilla surface a bouquet of light citrus and floral aromas that are joined by notes of hibiscus, beach plum and pineapple. In comparison to its agave cousins, Tequila and Mezcal, Raicilla is considered the most fragrant and fruity.

Our distillation process begins by roasting agave piñas for 2 days in an adobe oven to activate the natural sugars for fermentation. The agave piñas are then crushed before being placed in open oak barrels to naturally ferment using wild yeast. When the ferment is ready, the wort is double distilled in copper alembic stills to create Estancia’s aromatic Raicilla.

Much like the concept of terroir, the flavor of our Raicilla is created through the climate, geology and volcanic soil where our Lechuguilla grows. These conditions, along with our distillation process impart the floral aromatics that make this spirit truly special.

Sayulita festival masterclass

A photo posted by Estancia Distillery (@estancia_distillery) on

Find Raicilla Estancia Online:

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Sipping off the Cuff with Soltado Anejo Tequila

Mike and Alex taste and discuss Soltado Tequila, an anejo infused with serrano peppers and cinnamon.

soltado, tequila, anejo, serrano, cinnamonAbout Soltado:

At Soltado, our mission is simple: create the best products and bring people unique, exciting experiences. Every step of our tequila-making process has been refined to deliver on these principles. We found a craft distillery that combines traditional and modern methods and incorporated our own innovative ideas to bring you the evolution of tequila.

After years of searching for the best ingredients and perfecting our formula, we’re proud to present our launch product.

• 28 month añejo tequila
• Infused with locally grown serrano peppers and cinnamon
• Premium añejo flavor with a spicy, energizing kick and a smooth finish
• The only añejo infusion on the market

Soltado truly distinguishes itself from other tequila by adding one final step. We use a proprietary infusion process with serrano peppers from a farmers market near the distillery and natural cinnamon. These flavors are added to our already premium tequila to best complement its varying tastes.

Find Soltado Online:

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Oaxacan “Vintage” Chango Mezcaleros Makes a Comeback

Contemporary ChangoBy Alvin Starkman, M.A., J.D.

For a half century if not longer, the state of Oaxaca has been known for its mezcal, in the US, and to a lesser extent further abroad.  The region’s pre-Hispanic ruins, colonial architecture, cuisine and craft villages have been noted in travelogues and guide books for some time; but recently the iconic Mexican spirit has taken center stage, and hence the arrival of mezcal tourism.  It has gripped Oaxaca, and along with it, a revival of the chango mezcalero.

Chango mezcalero is a clay receptacle in the shape of a monkey, generally a liter in size or smaller.  Traditionally, and arguably dating back to the mid-1800s, it was used as a bottle to market and sell mezcal. It was a natural, since the primate has been associated with drunkenness for eons. Vintage ChangoIn the second of three articles authored by the writer, its history was dated to the 1930s based on uncovering a chango mold dated July 12, 1938, owned by the late Juventino Nieto of the Oaxacan town of San Bartolo Coyotepec.  In a cardboard box alongside it was a somewhat larger undated chango mold of the same vintage. Don Juventino was the husband of the late Doña Rosa Real of black pottery fame.  However, an alternate theory of the inventor of the chango, from the same village, has been put forward by members of his family.

Many of the old chango mezcaleros found today have written on the back, Recuerdo de Oaxaca (souvenir of Oaxaca), some have a couple’s first names on one side or the other (celebrating their marriage), and most but not all are multi-color, painted with the gloss in various stages of decline.

New "Vintage" ChangoFor the past couple of decades, and likely longer, vintage chango mezcaleros have become highly collectible, mainly by Americans interested in one or more of Mexican folk art, non-human primate imagery, and mezcal and its associated appurtenances.  “Old” clay monkey bottles are available on ebay, and on other websites specializing in the purchase and sale of vintage Mexicana and what are otherwise known as “smalls” from Mexico and the southwest US. Prices can be as low and $50 and as high as $500 USD.

It’s very difficult to discern whether or not a chango mezcalero was indeed made in the 1930s or earlier as some are represented. Antique dealers and aficionados know best how to date collectibles.  Most in the general public, however, do not have a clue, and if it looks old to them, it is.

There are currently at least three pottery workshops in the town of Santiago Matatlán which have been producing chango mezcaleros for decades, and continuing to date.  Matatlán is known as the world capital of mezcal, boasting the globe’s highest number of artisanal (and at least somewhat industrialized if not more so) small family owned and operated distilleries, or palenques as the traditional ones are locally known.  Some of these contemporary changos are upright, others are sitting on a log, and all are formed with the monkey in different poses.  Until recently, if the changos were painted, and most of the time they were, they were glossy.  The older ones, both tucked away gathering dust in the back of a palenque, and in local purchasers’ homes having been used, often show nice wear.

1938 Chango MoldAs of early 2016, or thereabouts, vintage looking changos have begun to appear in the marketplace in Oaxaca.  They have been spotted in at least one antique shop and one mezcalería. The coloring and patina is matte, and exquisite.  There are at least two sizes.  Most likely they are coming from the same workshop, using the same or similar molds as the shiny bottles, as is easily borne out by anyone who places the old and the new vintage side by side.

It is not suggested that the retailers noted above are motivated by misleading or defrauding the buying public, despite the fact that some are for sale in an antique store.  On the contrary, of those found in the latter outlet, some but not all are marked with the date 2015.

Visitors to Oaxaca and elsewhere in Mexico, collectors surfing the net, and retail shoppers in the US and further abroad , should all be vigilant, and not be misled by the outward look of years of use.  Oaxaca’s chango mezcalero has now come of age as a much more popular collectible than previously.  alvin starkman, mezcalCongratulations are indeed in order to the workshop which has identified the market.

About the Author:

Alvin Starkman operates Mezcal Educational Excursions of Oaxaca (http://www.mezcaleducationaltours.com). Alvin has been collecting chango mezcaleros for the past decade.  He has been a permanent resident of Oaxaca since 2004.

 

 

 

 

Sipping off the Cuff with Montejima Anejo

montejima anejoFrom Tequila Montejima:

We present to you cordially for offer our Tequila high quality Premium and international presentation.
We developed the Premium Tequila with the highest standards of quality managing to obtain a unique flavor and different to other tequilas. Tequila Montejima has been recognized in the international market by guaranteeing a 100% pure agave.
Therefore, I would appreciate having a business contact with you to present all the details of this majestic Tequila which undoubtedly will please its distinguished clientele.
We will be happy if i may send relevant data to establish a business proposal.

Find Montejima Tequila Online:

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Sipping off the Cuff with Alicantes Blanco

 

 

From the Alicantes website:

ENGLISH VERSION
Tequila is one of the oldest beverages in Mexico and the world, contrary to what people think, there are clues that our ancestors knew about distillation and were used a pair of pots for distill ; different cultures gave different names to this plant: metl, mecetl (Nahuatl), uadá (Otomi), Doba (Zapotec) and Akamba (Purepecha). The agaves were used by our ancestors to create spearheads, rope and other beverages such as “aguamiel” and “pulque”.

With the arrival of the Spaniards, the production process was enriched by merging the knowledge of both cultures without affecting the flavors, tradition and respect of our land, that should be retained during processing.

Tequila Alicantes preserves the tradition to make a distillate with this perfect fusion of cultures.

Snake, Coatl means wealth, wisdom and fear and was an important symbol for our ancestors in almost all our cultures. The Alicantes snakes are popular in the corn plots of Mexico, our ancestors considered that the Alicantes were sacred; they called them “Cincoatl” or “Cincuate” which translates as “The Corn Snake”. Because of their skin color people often say that they are “pintos”.

Our distillate is as before, like the first Tequilas, those who still have the full flavor and aroma of our land, unaffected by additives to give unnecessary colors and flavors. What is really important of a Tequila, is its agave taste, this fruit of the Mexican land grows by over 9 years for reach to your hands.

Harvested in free fields of herbicides chemicals and toxics, is made by Mexican hands under traditional methods such as cooking in stone ovens with a gentle extraction of agave honey in ancient mills with presses type “Trapiches”, and a natural slow fermentation with agave fibers without Chemical yeast and additives to accelerate. Our Master Tequilero implements high knowledge in his stills to separate volatile and heavy alcohols harmful to the body as so-called “heads and tails”, to obtain a true Tequila, which do not add anything more than the entire inheritance the great history of Mexico has given us.

The customs and flavors of our history must be respected.

VERSIÓN EN ESPAÑOL
El Tequila es de las bebidas más antiguas de México y el mundo, contrario a lo que se pueda pensar, existen pistas de que nuestros antepasados ya realizaban destilación de aguardientes de agave; diferentes culturas dieron distintos nombres a esta planta: metl, mecetl (náhuatl), uadá (otomí), doba (zapoteco) y akamba (purépecha). De los agaves aprovechaban para realizar puntas de lanza, hilo y otras bebidas como aguamiel y pulque.

Con la llegada de los Españoles, el proceso de elaboración se enriqueció fusionando los conocimientos de ambas culturas sin afectar los sabores que por tradición y respeto a nuestra tierra deben conservarse durante la elaboración.

En Tequila Alicantes preservamos esa tradición de hacer un destilado cuidando esa elaboración con la fusión perfecta de culturas.

La Serpiente, el Coatl, significa riqueza, sabiduría y temor y era un símbolo preponderante para nuestros antepasados en casi todas nuestras culturas. Los Alicantes son serpientes populares de las parcelas de maíz de los pueblos de México, nuestros antepasados creían que los Alicantes custodiaban el fruto del hombre y se les consideraba animales sagrados y respetados; les llamaban “Cincoatl” o “Cincuate” que se traduce como “La serpiente del Maíz” y por su color la gente dice usualmente que están “pintos”.

Nuestro destilado es como los de antes, como los primeros, de esos que aún conservan el completo sabor y aroma de los Agaves de nuestra tierra sin ser afectados por aditivos para dar colores y sabores innecesarios. Lo verdaderamente necesario de un Tequila, es su sabor a Agave, su sabor al fruto de la tierra Mexicana que crece por más de 9 años para poder llegar a tus manos.

Cosechado en campos libres de Herbicidas Químicos y Tóxicos, está elaborado por manos Mexicanas bajo métodos Artesanales como cocimiento de sus piñas en Hornos de Roca Volcánica con recubrimiento de Arcilla, con una extracción suave de mieles en molinos antiguos con prensas tipo “Trapiches” y con una fermentación lenta, natural con fibras de agave y sin levaduras Químicas. Nuestro Maestro Tequilero pone en práctica altos conocimientos en su destilación en alambiques para separar alcoholes volátiles y pesados dañinos para el cuerpo como los llamados “colas y cabezas” para así obtener un verdadero Tequila, al que no agregamos otra cosa más que toda la herencia que la gran historia de México nos ha brindado.

Porque las costumbres y los sabores de nuestra historia deben respetarse.

The definition of ol’ skool tequila. #noadditives #handcrafted #amatitan

A photo posted by Tequila Aficionado (@tequilaaficionado) on

Find Alicantes Online:

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Tequila Aficionado’s Open Bar with Mestizo Mezcal

Join Mike Morales and Lisa Pietsch of Tequila Aficionado as they discuss Mestizo Mezcal with the creators of this award winning gateway mezcal.

Save Mezcal! Click Here to Sign the Petition Against Nom 199

nom 199

From the Mestizo Mezcal Website:

Our Brand

The name of our brand, MESTIZO, is a perfect one-word description of how mezcal was created. Mestizo originates from the Latinmixticĭus, meaning mixed, and was used by the Spanish to refer to the mixing of the European and indigenous Mexican people.   Mezcal is a fusion between the ancient beverage mexcalli, produced by the indigenous tribes of Mexico, and the alambique distillation process introduced to the Spanish by the Moors and subsequently brought by the Spanish to the indigenous civilization of the American colonies.  Mezcal is thus the first MESTIZO spirit of America.

What is Mestizo Mezcal?

Mestizo Mezcal is an ancient spirit that is unique because of its distinctive, complex and aromatic flavors.  Mezcal was produced centuries ago by the Zapotec tribe in Mexico, and was considered to be a gift from the goddess Mayahuel.  In the 16th century, the Spanish introduced a specialized European distillation process to the Zapotec tribe that was used to improve the ancient beverage.  Today, the founders of Mestizo Mezcal works with its producers from the Mexican state of Oaxaca to further define and enrich the taste of our product and create a perfect convergence of cultures within each bottle.

Find Mestizo Online:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Buy Mestizo Online

Hi-Time Wine Cellars | Wally’s Wine & Spirits

NOM 199 Will Bring the Tequila & Mezcal Apocalypse

[This editorial (with my comments) is inspired by the following video on the dastardly NOM 199 currently in review in Mexico.  Please, take a few moments to view this easy-to-follow video, then, feel free to share it among your friends, family, colleagues and cohorts.

Afterwards, go here to sign the petition and unifying statement against NOM 199.]

¿Qué es la NOM199? / What is NOM199 from pedro jimenez gurria on Vimeo.

First, a Little History

In 2012, a Mexican legislation called NOM 186 was launched that would regulate any agave spirit.  It would have deprived many rights to small traditional and artisanal mezcal producers outside the Denomination of Origin of Tequila and Mezcal.

All other agave spirits would have been erroneously called “AGUA ARDIENTE de AGAVECEA.”

It would have also trademarked the word “AGAVE” to the Tequila Industry.

This would be like trying to trademark the word “grape.”

Imagine small winemakers not being able to say that their wine was made from grapes because they didn’t own the trademark, “grape?”

Dumb, huh?

Both these measures were driven by the Tequila Industry and the Mexican Ministry of Economy, among other institutions.

Through the efforts of those in the academic fields, hospitality (bars and restaurants), interested WORLD citizens with large social media followings, and those concerned about the fair regulation of what we eat and drink, this NOM was soundly defeated.

NOM 199: The Zombie of NOM 186!

Now, there’s a new initiative that’s designed to revive those previously rejected proposals.

It has been signed and endorsed by the Tequila Industry, the Regulatory Board of Mezcal, and other transnational corporations—and you know who they are!

This time, they aim to misinform you the consumer, about what you are drinking by renaming agave spirits outside of the Denomination of Origins of Tequila and Mezcal as “KOMIL.”

Ever hear of the term komil?

Me, neither.

Nobody has.

There are no cultural records or documents anywhere in Mexico that refer to an agave distillate by the term komil—

None.

It is based on a Nahuatl word (KOMILI) meaning, “intoxicant [inebriating] drink.”

If one of NOM 199’s very own passages is correct:

“The information printed on the labels of the bottles must be truthful and not induce confusion in the consumer as to the nature and characteristics of the product,” then…

They’re doing it all wrong.

If these distillates are forced to be labeled KOMIL and forbidden to use the word AGAVE, it will be more ambiguous and confusing to the consumer and he/she won’t be as informed as to what the drink is made from.

Komil could literally be eggnog like rompope, a tequila or mixto tequila, or any drink that intoxicates.

Currently, any mezcal outside of the Denomination of Origin cannot be termed Mezcal.  Instead it is referred to as “destilado de agave” (agave distillate) or “aguardiente de agave” (agave firewater).

That is already a huge commercial disadvantage.

If this legislation passes and becomes law, these spirits would be forced to label themselves as KOMILES [plural of KOMIL].

This would not only increase unfair competition and confuse the consumer, but would also deprive the basic human rights of those who preserve the tradition of making these distillates by calling them by their actual true name.

This proposed legislation is a cultural and labor dispossession, and an arbitrarily imposed term.

It is designed to wipe out or erase the cultural, historical and familial stories inherent in each beautiful and distinctive agave spirit.

 Consider it a form of genocide.

fb 199Imagine not ever being able to tell the story behind your grandmother’s favorite recipe for cookies or apple pie even though it’s been in your family for generations?

We agree that all alcoholic beverages need some sort of regulation because there are those unscrupulous producers whose beverages deceive and defraud consumers and threaten their health.

This is precisely why we demand consistent, detailed, inclusive, normas (laws) with not only an economic basis in mind, but with academic and bio-cultural, as well.

The spirit that each of these small producers make are derived by distilling AGAVE.

There’s no reason to lie and call it KOMIL.

Let’s call it what it is.

Stay informed and protect what’s yours—The National Heritage. #sellamamezcal  #NoKomil

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