Spice Up The Holidays with Peligroso Cinnamon!

peligroso cinnamonPeligroso CinnamonPeligroso Cinnamon is back!

I can’t tell you how happy I am to see Peligroso Cinnamon out and about again since its move to Diageo.

We received a sample of the previous infusion (before the Diageo buy out and distillery move) and it was a huge hit with us.  In fact, we awarded it a Silver medal in the 2013 Brands of Promise Awards.

We particularly enjoyed using this expression in the Tequila Aficionado Test Kitchen.  Here are some links to articles where we mentioned recipes we created with it:

 

Truth be told, we had quite a few other recipes we wanted to try, like a particular pumpkin truffle and a few others, but one bottle only lasts so long when it is that good – and it was.

We’re hoping Diageo will enter Peligroso Cinnamon into the 2016 Brands of Promise Competition as a comeback brand (and I wouldn’t mind working on several new recipes in the test kitchen as well).  In the meantime – here are some festive Peligroso Cinnamon cocktails for your next holiday party:

 

Peligroso Fiery MargaritaFiery Margarita

  • 1.25 oz. Peligroso Silver
  • .75 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
  • .25 oz. Agave Nectar
  • .25 oz. Peligroso Cinnamon

Add first three ingredients into an ice filled shaker. Shake and strain into salt-rimmed rocks glass filled with ice. Garnish with lime slice. Make it fiery by adding Peligroso Cinnamon.

 

Peligroso Tropical Storm

 

Tropical Storm

  • 1 oz. Peligroso Silver
  • .5 oz. Peligroso Cinnamon
  • 1 oz. Fresh Grapefruit Juice
  • .5 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
  • .5 oz. Agave Nectar
  • Lime Slice

Add first five ingredients to an ice filled shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into an ice-filled rocks glass. Garnish with lime.

 

Peligroso Baja BlitzBaja Blitz

· 1 oz. Peligroso Cinnamon

· Pint of Choice

Pour chilled Peligroso Cinnamon into shot glass. Enjoy with your favorite pint of beer.

 

 

Peligroso Mexican MuleMexican Mule

·         1.5 oz. Peligroso Cinnamon

·         4 oz. Ginger Beer

·         1 Orange Wedge

Fill a copper mug with ice. Squeeze an orange wedge into the glass and drop on top of the ice. Add Peligroso Cinnamon to spice it up. Top with ginger beer.

 

THE PELIGROSO® STORY: After countless trips chasing big breaks on the beaches of Baja, two avid surfers from Southern California found themselves in awe of the region’s culture and its quality tequila. The duo would revel each day’s adventure with a shot of Tequila, or Surfer’s Martini, which struck a deep appreciation for the spirit. In 2009, they founded Peligroso® Tequila, a 100% Blue Weber Agave Tequila, inspired by their thirst for life, adventure and great stories.

Embodying a deep respect for Mexico, Peligroso® Tequila is their tribute to the country’s beauty, rugged edge and rich traditions. Made the traditional way in the highlands of Jalisco, the spirit’s sense of adventure is found in each of its Tequila variants. Peligroso® variants include 100% Blue Weber Agave Silver, Reposado, and Anejo Tequilas and Peligroso® Cinnamon.

Do you dare to join Peligroso® and Rattle The Cage?

Peligroso® Cinnamon is infused with 100% pure cinnamon and a blend of ingredients for a kick that leaves some sweet heat.

FLAVOR PROFILE: Warm and savory with spicy aromas and a light finish, Peligroso® Cinnamon is a cinnamon flavored tequila liqueur that finishes with the perfect amount of sweet heat on the palate

SERVE: The perfect shot for all occasions – even better chilled with an orange slice

ABV: 70 proof, 35% (ABV)

BOTTLE: The burnt red coloring of the glass is inspired by rich Mexican heritage and the sweet heat finish of the liquid

FORMAT: Available in a 750mL, 1.0L, 375mL and 50mL bottle

MSRP: $22.99/750mL, $26.99/1.0L, $12.99/375mL and $1.99/50mL

AVAILABILITY: Peligroso® Cinnamon is available nationwide and year-round

 

Diddy Disses Tequila’s Jimadores….

What’s Wrong With This Picture?

Diddy looking conspicuously out of his element.
Diddy looking conspicuously out of his element.

By now, many of you may have already seen both of these distasteful photos on Diddy’s Instagram account for his new venture with Diageo and DeLeón tequila that began in early 2014.

Dressed in his trademark dark suit, Diddy attempts to sacrifice a blue agave piña while at the same time asking for a moment of silence for “Mr. Pat Ron,” a thinly veiled dig against beverage behemoth, Patrón.

Those in the Tequila Community who make their living day after day selling,

Note the look of disdain on the jimador's face.
Note the look of disdain on the jimador’s face.

serving and producing tequila, as well as growing and harvesting agave, have been outraged at the clownish way in which Diddy and Diageo have disrespected and belittled the value of one of the last major pillars left in Tequila Culture–the jimador (agave harvester).

The Plight of the Jimador

In an age where modern technology and cost saving methods like the diffuser have been introduced in the Tequila Industry to replace everything from donkeys to bottlers to label applicators, the one skill that it has not yet been able to replace entirely is the hard labor of the jimador.

Jimador, courtesy of Tequila G4.
Jimador, courtesy of Tequila G4.

Those who have seen these men in action, and those of us who have tried to hack off the pencas (leaves) from a blue agave piña using a razor sharp coa, know that it’s not as easy as it looks.

The following video is courtesy of the Tequila Interchange Project, a non-profit organization and consumer advocacy group for agave distilled spirits made up of key influencers such as bartenders, consultants, teachers, researchers, consumers and tequila aficionados.  It illustrates just how arduous this work is, and the dangers these men face each day for minimal pay.

For Diddy to be allowed to be photographed attempting a jima wearing a suit and spotless shoes was unconscionable.  It makes light of the skill and experience of these journeymen laborers, as well their hardships, in a deplorable and condescending way.

Diddy Commits Commercial Suicide with DeLeón Tequila

If it’s true that Diddy knows what liquor Millennials want to drink as he states in this November 2014 article in Fortune, and wants to “disrupt how [liquor advertising] has been done,” he has already failed miserably.

Claiming that his image won’t be used for DeLeón like it has been attached to his

Jimador lifting piñas.  Courtesy of Tequila G4.
Jimador lifting piñas. Courtesy of Tequila G4.

Ciroc vodka ads (his first successful partnership with Diageo), then he should stick to his word.

The Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS), the national trade association for America’s top distillers, and of which Diageo is a long time member, has strict guidelines when it comes to responsible digital marketing communications.

It is obvious that Sean Combs believes he is above adhering to these regulations, and in the process, managed to insult an entire country.

How Diddy Should’ve Done It

Jimador at work.  Courtesy of the Consejo Regulador del Tequila.
Jimador at work. Courtesy of the Consejo Regulador del Tequila.

The self-proclaimed tastemaker has proven to be very successful in everything he touches.  From music and clothing, to spirits and even reality TV, Diddy has left his indelible mark with sophistication and style.  So, when he hooked up with Diageo once more for DeLeón tequila, we expected more from him.

We expected this $700 million dollar mogul to immerse himself in Tequila Culture.  To get to know the process and the people of the new spirit he was embracing, and to bring a fresh look to an otherwise unremarkable brand like DeLeón.

We expected he would slap on some Sean John boots and venture out into the

Sean John Kingswood Moc boot.
Sean John Kingswood Moc boot.

agave fields to absorb its magic.  Who knows?  Maybe he would become inspired to design a whole new line of menswear made from agave fibers that would appeal to all ethnicities, just as he desires to do with DeLeón’s advertising.

How’s that for doubling your ROI and gaining street cred?

We’re NOT Laughing With You

Instead, we get this…

"So, if I wanna be number one, there has to be a number two."
“So, if I wanna be number one, there has to be a number two.”

Perhaps, we expected too much?

[In 2010 there were 6 other brands besides Ciroc that the San Francisco World Spirits Competition bestowed double gold medals to in the vodka category.]