How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas

The Bing Crosby Effect

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

Influencer Marketing is a hot social media buzz phrase that can be directly attributed to Bing Crosby.

From the moment the famed crooner, and fellow entertainer and business partner, Phil Harris, imported Herradura, the first 100% agave tequila into the US, celebrity endorsements of alcoholic beverages have influenced American’s buying habits–

And, become an all too common occurrence.

This article traces the history of influencer marketing, from the early days of cinema to a new kind of social media personality, the influencer.

I Wanna be Like Mike

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

Continuing that tradition, celebs like Diddy (DeLeon), George Clooney (Casamigos), Sammy Hagar (Cabo Wabo, and now, Mezquila), and Justin Timberlake (Sauza 901) are just a few of the A-listers peddling agave spirits.

It can be argued that desire for a megastar endorsed item is fueled by our emotional attachment to the star himself.

Hence, the more we care about a renowned personality, the more we “want to be like Mike.”

Celebrity Covetousness

Noel Shu is Chief Luxury Officer and Head Sommelier at Prodiguer Brands, Ltd.  The “Prince of Luxury,” and the man responsible for the most expensive champagne in the world, (Goût de Diamants) explains here why celebrity affiliation works for luxury items.

“No matter what, the rest of the world is keeping tabs on the rich and famous.  In order to be more like them, many go out of their way to get what celebrities have,” asserts Shu.

“Beneath the pretense of glam, money and prestige, a purchase boils down to one thing: familiarity.  It is mental association at work.”

Shu determines, “When a person is constantly reminded that their favorite actor is wearing or using a product, they begin gravitating towards the item themselves.”

The danger in promoting celebrity covetousness in agave spirits brand marketing is that it’s shallow, superficial, and unmemorable.

The emotional bond between your label and your customer, like a sample from a tequila girl in a black mini-skirt, is fleeting, at best.

Intimacy Can be Measured

On the flip side, a very enlightening website reveals a brand’s intimacy quotient.How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

MBLM states that “brand intimacy is a new paradigm that leverages and strengthens the emotional bonds between a person and a brand.”

Before I get to how this new level of marketing relates to agave spirits branding, let me point out a couple of Tequila Market growth facts, courtesy of the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS).

Who Cares About Luxury?

According to DISCUS, the fastest growth in 2016 has been in High End and Super Premium brands.

Virtually a non-existent segment before 2002, volumes of Super Premium tequilas have zoomed 706% to 2.9 million cases.

Intimacy by the Numbers

Taking a look at the Beverages category as a whole on the MBLM site, we discover that its intimacy quotient falls almost 4 points below the cross industry average.

Most notably, though, the Luxury division practically brings up the rear, a full 13 points below the industry median!

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

The numbers for Mexico are even more eye-opening (Abreojos?) with both Jose Cuervo and Herradura (Brown-Forman) at the bottom of the Top 10 Mexican Beverage labels of 2017.

Of the last two tequila marks, only Jose Cuervo is still Mexican owned.

Power to the People

“Brands are in the hands of consumers today,” says MBLM.

A true statement since, chances are, you’re reading this on your preferred handheld device.

MBLM goes on to preach,”…people trust one another more than they trust a corporation.”

We’ve heard it said that word-of-mouth—especially in social media–is everything.  (Just ask United Airlines!)

MBLM continues, “…brands are proliferating, saturating our attention, increasing confusion, and often cannibalizing each other.”

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

That’s certainly an honest view of the spirits industry.

A simple walk through your neighborhood liquor store’s tequila aisle will more than convince any skeptic of that assessment.

Given the above information on this new form of “emotional marketing,” it raises the question—

What’s the point of describing your agave spirit as a “luxury” or “lifestyle” brand?

Fearless Prediction

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50UWith the trend toward attracting Millennials, and their demand for quality, transparency and affordability in the wines and spirits they seek, the growth of the High End and Super Premium segments seem destined to falter.

Celebrity worship and their endorsement of products, however, will continue to be a part of the daily fabric of every social media platform.

As Shu points out in the above article, “No matter how much fanfare or glitz a product gets from being in the limelight, it’s the opinion of experts and influencers on the product itself that keeps it there.”

Luxury items are only attractive when in use by someone we care about or admire, famous or not.

Agave Attachment

How can start up agave spirits entrepreneurs create lasting emotional bonds between their products and their customers?

By telling their brand stories clearly, consistently, and emotionally in a creative and engaging manner across all mediums.

In addition, instead of trying to interest megastars to front your tequila or mezcal, decide to become your own best Agave Ambassador.

Bo Knows

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

The new breed of agave spirits brand owners must not be afraid to stand in front of their own juice to preach their message to the masses.

The Founding Fathers of the Tequila Industry knew the value of forging personal relationships with not just their business associates, but with everyone.

In the tradition of old skool tequileros, luminaries like Guillermo Erickson Sauza, Carlos Camarena, German Gonzalez, David Suro, Sophie Decobecq, Ken Austin, Dr. Adolfo Murillo, Tomas Estes and many others, have not only produced some of the most beloved tequilas, but have fearlessly chosen to be their own qualified spokespersons.

There’s No Crying in Tequila!

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

Agave spirits inherently embody the passion and history of Mexico.  If luxury items are cold and unfeeling, then, agave spirits are the complete opposite.

An agave spirit without a representative, however, is like a band without a front man; like a basketball team without a point guard; like a country without a leader.

No amount of marketing spin can improve a label’s lifeless approval rating, or a vote of no-confidence from customers.

Tequila:  Con Ganas!

“Advancements in neuroscience reveal that virtually all decision making is emotional,” declares MBLM.  “Behavioral science demonstrates that the way we feel about a brand is the single best predictor of purchase.”

MBLM concludes, “up to 90% of the decisions we make are based on emotion.”

How to Infuse Your Tequila Con Ganas http://wp.me/p3u1xi-50U

So, if you decide to be the ultimate emotional mouthpiece for your agave spirit, the bottom line is…

Echale ganas!

 

From Babes to Boss Ladies: Women & Tequila

Tequila Aficionado Exclusive Series

babes-to-boss-ladiesWe’ve had a special place in our hearts for the unsung heroines and muses in tequila for a very long time.  After reading Ilana Edelstein’s The Patron Way, Mike & I felt it was time someone brought other women’s stories to light – and what better place to do that than at the leader in tequila information since 1999 – Tequila Aficionado.

It all began with Tequila Boss Ladies and grew from there.  This series has grown over the years to include sotol, mezcal and agave spirits so there is still more to come!  In the meantime, you can catch up on the entire series to date.

From Babes to Boss Ladies

The contributions of women who create some of the amazing spirits we enjoy, direct production and distillation, support educational efforts, own brands we love, and otherwise contribute to the tequila industry are often overlooked beyond the 80’s throwback bikini-babe marketing efforts of behind-the-times brands.  (Perhaps that’s a bit harsh, but when women make 80% of the buying decisions in America today, don’t you think brands would be better served by changing their marketing approach with the times?)

Catch Up With The Series

Click on the links below to visit our ongoing series and explore some of the amazing contributions made by women in today’s tequila industry:

Women In The Tequila Industry: Sophie Decobecq by M. A. “Mike” Morales

No list of Tequila Boss Ladies would be complete without mentioning the likeable and charismatic Sophie Decobecq, creator of the award winning Calle 23 Tequila.

Aside from her wacky sense of humor where marketing her tequila is concerned (‘Tequila makes us smarter. So, drink smart” is one of her favorite slogans), Sophie has a unique perspective on the Tequila Industry.  Not just a female master distiller, Sophie is also French born which presents its own set of challenges.

To reiterate, we asked a short list of five questions to prominent women leading the charge for change in the Tequila Industry and beyond.

Read on!

***

TA:  How would you describe your experiences as a high ranking woman in your position in a primarily male dominated industry?

 SD:  It has been, so far, a rich human experience combined with a non-stop working period.

Tequila is a male dominated industry, or to be more precise, a Mexican male industry.  Meaning that there is a cultural dimension to it, with its own rules.

Being a foreigner, you have to respect them or better you do your life somewhere else.  I have been told only once by a tequilero that this was not a place for me, being a woman; this exception being completely forgotten thanks to many other tequileros who have made me a very nice space in their world.

Calle 23.
Calle 23.

 TA:  How have you been able to change things within your industry?

 SD:  Did I ever change anything? (laughs). What I may have added is a point of view from a non-native person, with cultural habits of protecting traditions.  I still view through French eyes this industry in which I am deep inside for more than a decade, giving me the pride to represent, as best as possible, this Mexican treasure I fell in love with, and to spread the word about the category that is for me the future of tequila:  “tequila 100% agave”giving the full spirit of the agave plant (compared to the category “tequila”which is produced with only a minimum of 51% of agave).

My way of working in this industry follows a woman’s heart, which I would describe in my case as encouraging local economy, sustainable processes and Mexican culture, instead of having a business focused on money efficiency.

Please don’t literaly interprete this, as this is a very general vision.  There are many amazing men here doing this too, an example being Carlos Camarena from Tapatio keeping a place for his employees until they decide to retire.

TA:  What do you see as the future of women working within the Tequila Industry?

 SD:  Future is to build!  The industry is growing and there will be naturally space for more men and women. Current problem is that women are confronted with more difficulties to enter into it:  for the fact of being a woman, their capacity to handle the work is a challenge.  Same, in fact, as in other industries like politics.

Tequila Rules!
Tequila Rules!

There has been a female candidate running for Mexican presidency this year, and comments you could hear in medias and in the streets were mostly about being a woman more than about her program.  Which ever program each candidate had during these elections, no time was spent to question the fact that the other candidates were “men.”  Same in tequila, when importance should be on the objectives and the paths chosen.  Don’t you think?

TA:  What things would you like to see changed?

 SD:  Less judgment based on gender.  I am not a feminist, just humanist:  considering people for their ideas and the persistency of their actions rather than their gender or social level from where they come from.

[The Tequila] Industry had amazing women in the past, leading and impacting tequila empire as Herradura.  It would be good to see that native women could have the opportunity to retake more often that place, if they are the best ones.  Not for being a woman, but for being the individual person that would be the best leader at that moment, as it actually was the case with Carmelita [Villarreal] from San Matias and Lucretia from Siete Leguas.

TA:  Is there anything you’d like to say to women who may be contemplating entering and working in the Tequila Industry in one form or another?

Sophie Decobecq (Photo by Chris McCarthy)
Sophie Decobecq (Photo by Chris McCarthy)

SD:  If this is your dream, follow it!!

Advice that I would give is persistency, respect for the amazing knowledge Mexicans have about this process that they have as a heritage, and unconditional patience for all the unexpected you will find on you way.

This unexpected and unplanned part is frustrating at the beginning, but trust me, after some time you kind of become addicted to it.  Every day is a challenge with many efforts to give, but you then earn a life with beautiful aromas and flavors around you, as well as joy, smiles, music, street-non-stop-sounds, colors, beauty of agave plants and so much more.

Welcome to [the] Tequila world!

***

Follow Sophie Decobecq on Facebook.

Follow Calle 23 Tequila on Twitter @TequilaCalle23

Never miss and article or review again – Subscribe now!

* indicates required

Email Format

View previous newsletters.



Tequila Boss Ladies by M.A. “Mike” Morales

Carmen Villareal, san matias

Tequila Boss Ladies

 “The world will be saved by the western woman.”

The Dalai Lama, Vancouver Peace Summit, September 2009

We’re pretty sure His Holiness had no idea that his proclamation would also include this Who’s Who of women in the Tequila Industry and beyond.

Mary ClementeJurado Tequila…

Mary Clemente gets her close-up.Exclusivity breeds demand and Clemente’s Jurado Tequila, nicknamed the Black Swan (a metaphor used to describe hard-to-predict, high-impact and far-reaching events), is so rare that you’ll have to travel to Asia or the Middle East to find it.

Jurado Tequila (photo by Ian Cuttler).
Jurado Tequila (photo by Ian Cuttler).

Solely at Duty Free stores winter 2013, with rock star celebrity chef Grant MacPherson supplying added culinary deliciousness for the tequila connoisseur and world traveler.

Paula TorresNobleza Azúl tequila…

Nobleza Azul Tequila.
Nobleza Azul Tequila.

Not only does Paula own her own brand, but she comes from a family of Highlands agave growers.  Fiercely protective of her family’s land, heritage and tradition, Paula is involved in every aspect of Nobleza’s growth.

Paula Torres
Paula Torres

Find award winning Nobleza Azúl throughout Southern California and parts of Chicago, Las Vegas and Utah.

Watch our Sipping off the Cuff episode for Nobleza Azul here.

Maribel Garcia CanoTequilas del Señor

The mysterious Ingeniera García craftily flies under the tequila radar.

Quietly going about her business supervising the quality of the tequilas churned out at the famed Tequilas del Señor distillery, she has also managed to develop the critically acclaimed Don Diego Santa Tequila.

Don Diego Santa Tequila
Don Diego Santa Tequila

 

 

“…women would become the ‘saviors of the global economy.'”

  CNN, October 2012

Carmen Alicia Villarreal TreviñoTequila San Matías de Jalisco

Carmen Villareal
Carmen Villarreal

 

 

CEO Villarreal is the only female distillery owner to date.

Launching the legendary brand Carmessí in 1999, created with the essence of today’s women in mind, its website declares, “At Casa San Matías we’ve developed different tequilas to suit all of our clients, from daring women to experienced consumers.”

Available in major markets in the US and Europe.

Dr. Ana Valenzuela-Zapata

La Diosa Mayahuel (Photo by Alberto Ramirez)
La Diosa Mayahuel (Photo by Alberto Ramirez)

Known by some as “La Diosa Mayahuel” (the Goddess Mayahuel), Ana is the final word on agave ethno-botanics and the conservation of all native species of agaves in Mexico.

This published author frequently consults to agave growers and tequila brand owners.

An outspoken advocate for agave biodiversity and defending tequila’s Appellation of Origin, her next book, The Geographic Indication of Tequila, will cover just that.

Ana Maria Romero Mena

Maestra Tequilera, Ana Maria Romero Mena.
Maestra Tequilera, Ana Maria Romero Mena.

The only woman to be given the title of “Maestra Tequilera” by the powerful National Chamber of the Tequila Industry (CNIT), Ana Maria has consulted and taught seminars for every major tequila producer in the business, as well as developed several signature tequila brands for others.

She’s even designed a kit to help describe tequila aromas and written an award-winning book on the subject.

Sophie DecobecqCalle 23 Tequila

How does a nice French biochemist/engineer become a tequila brand owner?   Simple…

Sophie Decobecq (Photo by Chris Mac)
Sophie Decobecq (Photo by Chris Mac)

She falls in love with the fermentation process, develops three different yeast cultures and produces three very different tasting tequilas.

Infusing them with her wacky sense of humor (“Tequila drives a Cadillac” is a favorite t-shirt slogan), Calle 23 is an award winner in both the US and the UK.

Calle 23.
Calle 23.

 

 

Jaclyn JacquezPresident, Don Cuco Sotol

The next hottest Mexican spirit to hit the market is not exactly tequila or mezcal.  Don Cuco Sotol has been described as the best of both worlds.

Outside of its own Denomination of Origin in the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Durango and Coahuila, sotol has been a mystery for over 800 years.

Jaclyn Jacquez, President of Don Cuco Sotol.
Jaclyn Jacquez, President of Don Cuco Sotol.

Jacquez, the great-granddaughter of Don Cuco, trademarked the name in both Mexico and the US and then began exporting this sixth generation distillate into New Mexico, Texas, California, and New Zealand.

Bertha González NievesCEO, Casa Dragones tequila…

Bertha González Nieves, CEO of Casa Dragones.
Bertha González Nieves, CEO of Casa Dragones.

Along with co-founder and Clear Channel CEO Bob Pittman, Bertha has managed to craft a highly sought after joven tequila, an often overlooked expression in the industry.

With a flavor profile that’s perfect for pairing with a myriad of cuisines, it has been praised by celebrity boss ladies Martha Stewart and Oprah Winfrey.

(For more with Bertha González Nieves click here  and Casa Dragones, here.)

“…women need to be comfortable seeing themselves as qualified leaders and risk takers.”

Arianna Huffington

With these female front runners leading the charge for change, the Dalai Lama, CNN and Arianna Huffington might not be too far off the mark.

If you enjoyed this article, look for more articles, video, and interviews on women & tequila coming soon from Tequila Aficionado Media.

Never miss and article or review again – Subscribe now!

* indicates required

Email Format

View previous newsletters.